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At Advanced Cardiovascular Sleep Disorder Center in Auburn, AL, we always want to keep our clients informed. Check out our blog entries on the latest news and developments regarding sleep disorders.

How to sleep better with peripheral neuropathy

April 18, 2018 By Aishling Sleep Health Management - 0 Comments

How to sleep better with peripheral neuropathy

[by Tamara Sellman RPSGT CCSH for Advanced Cardiovascular Sleep Disorders Center] People with diabetes often experience something called peripheral neuropathy, which describes pain, numbness, and burning that occurs in the arms, hands, legs, and feet (especially the feet). This kind of pain (related to diabetes) is neurological, meaning it originates in the nervous system. For these people, sleep is twice as hard to achieve: diabetes can have a disruptive impact on sleep stages and cycles ...

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April's EYE ON HEART HEALTH: Links for sleep and cardiac health news

April 15, 2018 By Aishling Sleep Health Management - 0 Comments

April's EYE ON HEART HEALTH: Links for sleep and cardiac health news

For April 2018 THE FOLLOWING RECENT NEWS LINKS SHOW THE CONTINUED RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SLEEP HEALTH AND HEART HEALTH APRIL 9, 2018 || NEUROLOGY ADVISOR CPAP effective for sleep apnea treatment following stroke From the article: "The use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is an effective treatment for sleep-disordered breathing in patients who have experienced a stroke, according to the results of a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published recently in Neurology ...

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3 sleep disorders and their relationship to insulin resistance

April 11, 2018 By Aishling Sleep Health Management - 0 Comments

3 sleep disorders and their relationship to insulin resistance

DIABETES & SLEEP [by Tamara Sellman RPSGT CCSH for Advanced Cardiovascular Sleep Disorders Center] People who don’t sleep well may be setting themselves up for problems with insulin resistance. Sleeping well can be defined as getting adequate, consolidated sleep every night. Consolidated sleep simply means that one sleeps without interruption for the full night. If you don’t enjoy consolidated sleep most nights, and know you aren’t getting at least 7 hours of sleep at night, please read on. What is insulin resistance? All human bodies generate insulin, which is used to stabilize blood sugar effectively. Blood sugar (glucose) is used by all organs and cells as fuel, but too much or not enough can put the body into a state of stress. When insulin resistance occurs, the body may still produce insulin, but it fails to use it effectively to balance glucose levels. These levels build up in the blood as a result, and aren’t absorbed for use as fuel by the organs and cells. When this occurs repeatedly over time, prediabetes and type 2 diabetes can develop. DOES POOR SLEEP INFLUENCE INSULIN LEVELS? Research at Cedar-Sinai Medical Center published in 2015 found that even one night of sleep deprivation decreased insulin sensitivity by 33 percent in animal subjects. By comparison, 6 months on a high-fat diet decreased the subjects’ insulin sensitivity by 21 percent. Chronic sleep loss, or sleep deprivation, is defined as sleeping less than a total of 7 hours of sleep a night. Given that a large percentage of Americans routinely sleep less than 7 hours a night, this news regarding insulin resistance and its relationship to poor sleep is very concerning. Why does poor sleep lead to insulin resistance? People who are sleep deprived experience increased levels of the hormone ghrelin, which is known for stimulating the appetite. When ghrelin levels increase, we crave fatty or high-carbohydrate foods as a response to a cellular need for fuel. But higher ghrelin levels also lead to a surge in the bloodstream of the stress hormone, cortisol. High levels of cortisol make the body less tolerant to glucose and can negatively influence levels of blood glucose between meals (or while “fasting.”) Meanwhile, mixed signals in the organs of the endocrine system (responsible for metabolism) that are caused by sleep loss make the system less sensitive to insulin already available in the body (or “insulin resistant”). Inadequate levels of insulin are released to counteract high levels of blood sugar. When these levels become too high, the sleep-deprived body fails to produce enough insulin to achieve a proper gluocose-insulin balance. Too much glucose in the bloodstream can be dangerous, even deadly. The body responds to this system-wide threat by entering a state of stress, working overtime to process and excrete the excess glucose. This is the reason why people who are diabetic must use the bathroom many times a night; nocturia occurs as a result of the kidneys processing this excess sugar, which is eventually eliminated by frequent urination to regain a balance of glucose and insulin in the bloodstream. Nocturia is a common cause of sleep fragmentation, in which sleep is interrupted all night long. Broken sleep leads to less sleep and fewer cycles of complete sleep, which are necessary for optimal health and well being. THE CIRCADIAN SYSTEM AND METABOLISM Sleep is ...

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Sleep Architecture: What it is and why it matters

April 8, 2018 By Aishling Sleep Health Management - 0 Comments

Sleep Architecture: What it is and why it matters

[by Tamara Sellman RPSGT CCSH for Advanced Cardiovascular Sleep Disorders Center] Image courtesy University of Minnesota Libraries (open.lib.umn.edu ) Sleep architecture describes the parts of the biological process of sleep that create a whole "picture" of your night while asleep. Measuring the quality of one's sleep architecture includes data interpretations of components such as sleep stages, cycles, and sleep-wake phasing.  THE 4 SLEEP STAGES STAGE 1 (N1) [Up to 30 minutes, or ...

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What are the common sleep problems among diabetics?

April 7, 2018 By Aishling Sleep Health Management - 0 Comments

What are the common sleep problems among diabetics?

 ​[by Tamara Sellman RPSGT CCSH for Advanced Cardiovascular Sleep Disorders Center] As if people with diabetes don't already have enough problems with their health, sleep disorders can be both common and frustrating for them.  ​SLEEP DISORDERS & DIABETES Some sleep disorders can be a root cause for the development of type 2 diabetes, such as untreated sleep apnea. Both the central and obstructive varieties of this sleep-breathing disorder can lead to oxidative stress on the ...

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Diabetes and Sleep: The Dawn Phenomenon

April 1, 2018 By Aishling Sleep Health Management - 0 Comments

Diabetes and Sleep: The Dawn Phenomenon

DIABETES & SLEEP [by Tamara Sellman RPSGT CCSH for Advanced Cardiovascular Sleep Disorders Center] You’ve probably not heard of this term unless you have diabetes or know and care for someone who does. It relates to a condition of the glucose-insulin balance we all experience upon awakening which is guided by transitions in circadian rhythms. Diabetes & circadian rhythms When a person finds they are insulin resistant or diabetic, they learn quickly that they must try to achieve a perfect balance of insulin and glucose in their blood at all times. However, our circadian rhythms have a different plan: in the morning, our bodies are primed to tolerate more glucose after a night’s rest, but at night, we become less tolerant to spikes in blood sugar. Significant rises in blood sugar at the end of the night comprise what is known as the Dawn Phenomenon. A diabetic person might go to bed with their blood sugar in check, only to wake up to find their numbers skyrocketing in the morning. Everyone has a dawn phenomenon. However, while nondiabetic people will also experience a rise in glucose in the morning as part of their circadian rhythm, their bodies naturally respond to this rise with the automatic release of more insulin to rebalance their blood sugar. For people with diabetes, this can be a significant challenge to wake up to, as they are incapable of generating insulin in response to these glucose spikes. What causes the morning glucose surge? In all human beings, the liver generates glucose from its stores of starch and fatty acids. Other organs also produce smaller amounts. These organs normally act on dips in blood glucose at night as we sleep by generating enough to achieve glucose-insulin balance. As the body’s circadian rhythms shift to signal awakening, stress hormones are released into the bloodstream to help achieve wakefulness. This surge of new hormones increases insulin resistance, which signals for the liver to make even more glucose to maintain a balance so we have enough energy to get out of bed. People who do not have diabetes are able to generate rises in insulin levels to handle the extra glucose burdening the bloodstream. However, people with diabetes no longer have the ability to do this on their own, and must use insulin. Dawn phenomenon can be dangerous for some diabetics, who may not see a relief in their glucose levels for hours after awakening. This is a long time to experience uncontrolled blood sugar and can lead to vascular damage as well as increased risk for stroke, kidney disease, eye problems, diabetic neuropathy, and heart disease. The heart health connection At night, our bodies are guided by shifts in a number of circadian rhythms that include changes in autonomic nervous system function (which regulates stress), heart rate, and blood pressure regulation. Different kinds of hormones, meant to relax us so we can sleep, predominate. Then, as the morning arrives, new sets of hormones surge into the bloodstream to prepare for awakening. In fact, it’s these differences in vital signs over the course of the night, and into the morning, that can lead to morning heart attacks for those with heart disease and/or diabetes. Both conditions have a significant impact on the circadian rhythms that directly work with the heart; disrupting the very rhythms designed to protect the heart can lead to damaging consequences. In addition, rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep occurs more frequently in the second half of the sleep cycle, especially near the end, and during this time, blood pressure can vary widely and heart rate may increase just as changes in blood sugar are also occurring which can affect heart function. Factor in untreated insomnia, sleep apnea, or any other source of ...

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